An introduction to the history of xerox

Originally written for the 8-bit home computer Commodore 64 and shortly after, the Apple II series. It came with several application programs like a calendar and word processor, and a cut-down version served as the basis for America Online 's DOS client.

An introduction to the history of xerox

How the Photocopier Changed the Way We Worked—and Played Decades before 3-D printers brought manufacturing closer to home, copiers transformed offices, politics and art Xerox founder Joe Wilson with thewhich could make copies up to 9 by 14 inches.

An introduction to the history of xerox

Courtesy of Xerox Corporation Smithsonian Magazine Subscribe March Recently I visited Whisk, a Manhattan store that sells kitchen goods, and next to the cash register was a strange, newfangled device: The store bought the device—which creates objects by carefully and slowly extruding layers of hot plastic—to print cookie cutters.

Any shape you can think of, it can produce from a digital blueprint. There was a cutter in the shape of a thunderbolt, a coat of arms, a racing car. I could simply download one of hundreds of models that amateurs had already created and put online for anyone to use freely.

In the world of 3-D printers, people are now copying and sharing not just text and pictures on paper, but physical objects. Once, 3-D printers were expensive, elite tools wielded by high-end designers who used them to prototype products like mobile phones or airplane parts. Helpful folks have already scanned these objects and put them online.

History. Xerox was founded in in Rochester as The Haloid Photographic Company, which originally manufactured photographic paper and equipment. In Chester Carlson, a physicist working independently, invented a process for printing images using an electrically charged photoconductor-coated metal plate and dry powder "toner".Headquarters: Norwalk, Connecticut, U.S. Introduction to the Command WorkStation Xerox Phaser 16–9 The Command WorkStation interface The display illustrated below is the default Command WorkStation display in the middle of job processing. There are two other windows, Archive and Job . Introduction of the Xerox , the first automatic, plain-paper copier, proves to be a huge success. Company is renamed Xerox Corporation, and its stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

As 3-D printing gets cheaper and cheaper, how will it change society? One way to ponder that is to consider the remarkable impact of the first technology that let everyday people duplicate things en masse: Inventors had long sought a device to automate the process, with limited success.

Thomas Jefferson used a pantograph: As he wrote, a wooden device connected to his pen manipulated another pen in precisely the same movements, creating a mechanical copy. Steam-engine pioneer James Watt created an even cruder device that would take a freshly written page and mash another sheet against it, transferring some of the ink in reverse.

By the early 20th century, the state of the art was the mimeograph machine, which used ink to produce a small set of copies that got weaker with each duplication. The copier created an electrostatic image of a document on a rotating metal drum, and used it to transfer toner—ink in a powdered format—to a piece of paper, which would then be sealed in place by heat.

History of Xerox Corporation

It was fast, cranking out a copy in as little as seven seconds. When the first desk-size, pound machines were rolled out to corporate customers—some of whom had to remove doors to install these behemoths—the era of copying began. Or more accurately, the explosion of copying began.

Xerox expected customers would make about 2, copies a month—but users easily made 10, a month, and some as many asBefore the machine, Americans made 20 million copies a year, but by Xerox had boosted the total to 14 billion.

Indeed, it transformed the pathways through which knowledge flowed in a corporation.

Xerox Introduction: by tama fall on Prezi

Before the Xerox, when an important letter arrived, only a small number of higher-ups clapped eyes on it. But after the photocopier arrived, employees began copying magazine articles and white papers they felt everyone else should see and circulating them with abandon.

An introduction to the history of xerox

Why not send it to everyone? Copying was liberating and addicting.Introduction of the Xerox Copier. By , Haloid realized that its future was in the xerographic copier business, and the company changed its name to Haloid Xerox, Incorporated. In , it released one of the better known copiers in Xerox's history, the Xerox copier.

Introduction of the Xerox , the first automatic, plain-paper copier, proves to be a huge success. Company is renamed Xerox Corporation, and its stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Company Histories

Revitalized new product development at Xerox resulted in the introduction of 80 new products in alone, the most in company history and twice the number of the previous year. More Xerox products were being developed for the small office/home office market, with prices low enough that the company increasingly marketed its products .

innovation at xerox table of contents report on xerox corporation 2 introduction 2 history of xerox & the need to become innovative 4 product & services 6. Introduction to the Command WorkStation Xerox Phaser 16–9 The Command WorkStation interface The display illustrated below is the default Command WorkStation display in the middle of job processing.

There are two other windows, Archive and Job . History.

Fuji Xerox Ebina Plant has won the New Energy Minister of International Trade and Industry Prize, sponsored by the New Energy Foundation, for its best practice in the introduction of solar energy power generation equipment, in the 21st Century Type-Conserving Apparatuses and Systems awards. Our Innovation History Xerox has a proud tradition of pioneering research and continues to be in the forefront of innovation. Chester Carlson's invention of xerography more than 70 years ago was an extraordinary milestone in the development of the modern information age, as now individuals could much more easily share and access . Before the Xerox, when an important letter arrived, only a small number of higher-ups clapped eyes on it. The original would circulate from office to office, with a “routing slip” showing who.

Xerox was founded in in Rochester as The Haloid Photographic Company, which originally manufactured photographic paper and equipment. In Chester Carlson, a physicist working independently, invented a process for printing images using an electrically charged photoconductor-coated metal plate and dry powder "toner".Headquarters: Norwalk, Connecticut, U.S.

History of the graphical user interface - Wikipedia